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Showing posts with label hair. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hair. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 02, 2022

Is a widow's peak a flaw?

February 02, 2022 0 Comments

Hello everyone!


When I wrote about my large forehead, I didn't mention that I also have a widow's peak. Nevertheless, I never saw it as an imperfection. Growing up, I was surrounded by family members who shared this trait, thus I did not see it as a flaw. As a child, I was so used to widow's peaks that I used to find perfectly straight or rounded hairlines a little odd. 


widow's peak hairline


The name widow's peak comes from the hairline's likeness to the hoods that used to be worn by widows. In 18th century England, women mourning their husbands wore hoods or caps with triangular points that extended into their foreheads. For this reason, having this trait was considered an omen of early widowhood. In reality, this type of hairline is neither a bad omen nor a flaw!


A widow's peak is a dominantly inherited V-shape that dips down near the centre of the forehead. Female celebrities Marilyn Monroe, Alyson Hannigan, Fran Drescher, and Kourtney Kardashian also have widow's peaks.


In males, a receding hairline can sometimes result in a widow's peak hairline. For men that haven't had a widow's peak, if the hair thins at the temples, a receding hairline can take on that shape.


If you have a widow's peak, you can style your hair whichever way you like. The best way to show off your widow's peak is to slick your hair back or pull it into a ponytail. If you can't embrace your widow's peak, try side-swept bangs or a fringe to help conceal it. A pulled back ponytail parted down the middle can help balance the widow's peak's appearance. 


Do you have a widow's peak too? If so, do you consider it a flaw?


xoxo, Cosette



Friday, November 19, 2021

Four (4) DIY vegan scalp scrubs

November 19, 2021 0 Comments

 Hello everyone!


Many of us regularly use face and body scrubs to remove dead skin cells. However, we may be neglecting a part of our body that needs exfoliation just as much. The scalp is no different than the skin on the rest of our body. Our scalp can benefit from a little extra TLC as well!


Healthy hair starts with a healthy scalp! Daily use of hair products can cause build-up. In addition to typical dead skin cells accumulating on the scalp. This can result in clogged hair follicles, dull, greasy hair, and slower hair growth. To return the scalp to a healthy state, you need to free hair follicles from what’s building up at the roots. A scalp scrub might be the best solution. 


If you’re looking for natural DIY scalp scrubs, here are four (4) easy DIY vegan recipes that can cure and prevent dry, flaky scalp, improve scalp health and overall hair health. 


sugar scrub

Ingredients:


DIY vegan scalp scrub #1
  • 2 tablespoons of baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon of vegan shampoo
  • a few drops of lavender essential oil 

DIY vegan scalp scrub #2
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt (ideal for oily scalp)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

DIY vegan scalp scrub #3
  • 1 tablespoon of vegan conditioner or coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons of sea salt (for oily scalp) or raw sugar 

DIY vegan scalp scrub #4
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon of coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons of raw sugar
  • a few drops of tea tree essential oil 


Because of its high level of acidity, apple cider vinegar can help balance the scalp’s pH. This is especially helpful if you need to clarify your scalp of hard water build-up.


Method:

  1. Choose one of the DIY recipes.
  2. Mix all of these ingredients together.
  3. Gently massage the scrub into your scalp. 
  4. Leave it on for about 5 minutes. 
  5. Rinse it out with warm water.
  6. Shampoo and condition.


By massaging a scrub into your scalp, you’ll stimulate blood circulation, remove stubborn oil and build-up, and deliver oxygen to your scalp. In turn, this encourages hair growth. Give it a try! 




Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Canine beauty routine | DIY tips for grooming your dog at home

November 17, 2021 0 Comments

 Hello everyone!


All dog guardians know that our pups need a beauty routine too. Dogs are more than just man’s best friend; these furry companions are members of our family. And what proud pet guardian wouldn’t want their family to look their best?  Grooming consists of several tasks. Rascal (my Maltipoo) needs regular grooming! I brush his coat daily, and at least two or three times a week, I need to clean his teeth and remove tear stains. He hates having his face touched, so this is a nightmare every time! Then, once a month, I bathe him, trim his nails, clean his ears and give him a haircut! Keep reading to see Rascal's before and after pictures...


Here are ten (10) tips to help with at-home grooming:


dog resting its head on a pillow

  1. Stay calm and give treats. Start with short sessions and reward your pet with praise or high-value treats. 
  2. Brush your pet regularly. Just a few minutes of brushing helps remove dirt, excess hair, tangles and mats while distributing oils that help keep the skin and coat healthy. Use a dog hair detangler, if needed.
  3. Bathe regularly. You should bathe your dog about once a month unless it seems smelly or dirty.
  4. Do not skip the conditioner. If your dog has long hair, then a dog conditioner is a must. Long coats can quickly become tangled and prone to matting, so conditioning will make brushing easier.
  5. Remove tear stains. White dogs are more likely to have visible tear staining on their faces because the pigments in their tears can easily dye light-coloured fur. Also, dogs with long hair on their faces may be more prone to excessive tearing. I use a cotton disc to wipe Rascal's tear stains with Optrex Eye Wash. I tried tear stain remover wipes and pads but found that Optex is just as effective and less expensive. And it's perfectly safe to use on your dog.
  6. Trim nails regularly. Regular walks on cement roads and sidewalks can help wear down your dog’s nails. However, when you can hear your dog’s nail clicking on the floor, it’s time for a trim. Start by handling each paw and rewarding your pet with treats or praise when they remain calm. Then begin to touch the paw with the nail trimmer and follow with a reward. Work your way up to trimming a single nail. Then gradually trim more nails as your pet allows. 
  7. Use a scratch board. A scratch board is like a giant nail file for your dog! It's a flat board with sandpaper glued to it. Most dogs are comfortable dragging their nails across 30-40 grit sandpaper, which files down nails fast. This can be an alternative for dogs who are afraid of nail clippers!
  8. Avoid the quick. You’ll want to avoid cutting the quick, it includes a blood vessel and nerve and is easier to see on light dog nails. If your pet has dark nails, trim the very tip of each nail and continue making small cuts until you see a black dot in the centre of the nail. If your dog is using a scratch board, keep the sessions short to keep the dog from accidentally quicking his nails.
  9. Use ear hair powder. Shih Tzus, Poodles, Maltipoos and Bichon Frises are just some of the breeds that grow thicker hair inside their ears. Unfortunately, hair growing inside the ear can impede the flow of air that is needed to keep the ear passages dry. It can also trap excess ear wax, dirt, and debris. All of these can increase your dog’s risk of infection. Dog ear powder is used to make the removal of excess hair easier, by making the hair inside a dog's ear easier to grip. It can also help control ear odour and keep ears dry, helping to prevent infection.
  10. Do not neglect oral hygiene.  Not all dogs will accept a toothbrush in their mouth. Rascal hates his dog toothbrush and toothpaste, he runs away as soon as he sees them. As an alternative to brushing, rubbing coconut oil on your dog’s teeth and gums can assist with reducing plaque-causing bacteria. I use a finger toothbrush for dogs to massage the coconut oil on Rascal's teeth. Do not use human toothpaste!

This is a photo of Rascal before grooming!


And this is a photo of Rascal after grooming! He looks like a different dog!





Do you have a furry companion as well? Leave a comment with your pets' names below!

Talk to you soon!
 



Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Fact or Fiction? #4 - Curly hair myths, debunked!

September 14, 2021 2 Comments

Hello everyone!


I have not published a Fact or Fiction? post in such a long time, but this is, actually, my fourth beauty myths post. These posts are meant to debunk common beauty myths and misconceptions. For this fourth (4th) post, I chose to focus on curly hair. 


I have a loose curl pattern (2c/3a) and, I have been wearing my hair naturally, on and off, for over a decade. I haven't straightened my hair in almost two and a half years! Needless to say, I learned quite a few tips and tricks along this journey. I found a lot of helpful information online, but also a lot of misinformation such as:


1. Do not wash your hair more than once a week.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


There is no one golden rule when it comes to hair cleansing. If you don’t wash your hair enough, it will become flat and greasy. If you wash it too often, it will be dry and frizzy. You should wash your hair when it needs to be cleansed.



2. You only have curly hair if you don’t have to scrunch it.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Some people believe that if your hair is not curly while wet, you don’t have curly hair. Wet hair is elongated and weighed down with water. Thus, the curl or wave pattern is hidden. This is why shrinkage happens, where curly hair often looks shorter when dry.


women with curly hair

3. You can use high heat to diffuse your hair without causing damage.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Many believe that since the diffuser attachment diffuses the heat, it will not cause damage. Unfortunately, the truth is that heat always leads to some damage. If you must use heat, use it as little as possible, and always protect your hair with a heat protectant.



4. Wash your hair with conditioner only.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Applying conditioner on wet hair and rinsing it out is moisturising hair, not washing it. If you want to cleanse your hair, you need to use a shampoo, cleansing conditioner or a co-wash. These products contain ingredients that help remove dirt, impurities and product buildup. 



5. Silicones and sulphates damage your hair.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


This is a core rule of the Curly Girl Method (CGM) and a huge misconception:

Silicones coat the hair and cover up the damage. As they build up, the most efficient way to remove them is by using sulphate shampoo. However, sulphates strip natural oils, causing dryness, frizz and damage. Thus, creating a vicious cycle. According to the CGM, you should never ever use them.


Silicones are not inherently bad for hair; water-insoluble silicones do build up on the hair shaft and are difficult to remove, however, water-soluble ones are easily removed with gentle shampoos, including sulfate-free shampoos.

Sulphates can be damaging to your hair. But they can also have some benefits; without cleansing sulphates, sebum quickly builds up on the scalp. This buildup will lead to a lot of itchiness, flakes, and over time this can lead to hair loss. Sulfate-free shampoos are an excellent option for most curlies, but if you feel the need to use a shampoo that contains sulphates, you can do so. The secret is to dilute it with water, only apply it to the hair roots and, alternate its use with a more moisturising shampoo. 



6. You must follow the Curly Girl Method.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


I think the Curly Girl Method is a good starting point for learning how to take care of curly hair, but it’s not the end-all-be-all of curly hair care. The truth is, it takes a lot of trial and error to find what works for your hair.


Curly hair is stunning, unique and sometimes hard to manage. Which one of these curl myths surprised you the most?