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Showing posts with label Sodium Laureth Sulfate. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sodium Laureth Sulfate. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Fact or Fiction? #4 - Curly hair myths, debunked!

September 14, 2021 2 Comments

Hello everyone!


I have not published a Fact or Fiction? post in such a long time, but this is, actually, my fourth beauty myths post. These posts are meant to debunk common beauty myths and misconceptions. For this fourth (4th) post, I chose to focus on curly hair. 


I have a loose curl pattern (2c/3a) and, I have been wearing my hair naturally, on and off, for over a decade. I haven't straightened my hair in almost two and a half years! Needless to say, I learned quite a few tips and tricks along this journey. I found a lot of helpful information online, but also a lot of misinformation such as:


1. Do not wash your hair more than once a week.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


There is no one golden rule when it comes to hair cleansing. If you don’t wash your hair enough, it will become flat and greasy. If you wash it too often, it will be dry and frizzy. You should wash your hair when it needs to be cleansed.



2. You only have curly hair if you don’t have to scrunch it.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Some people believe that if your hair is not curly while wet, you don’t have curly hair. Wet hair is elongated and weighed down with water. Thus, the curl or wave pattern is hidden. This is why shrinkage happens, where curly hair often looks shorter when dry.


women with curly hair

3. You can use high heat to diffuse your hair without causing damage.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Many believe that since the diffuser attachment diffuses the heat, it will not cause damage. Unfortunately, the truth is that heat always leads to some damage. If you must use heat, use it as little as possible, and always protect your hair with a heat protectant.



4. Wash your hair with conditioner only.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


Applying conditioner on wet hair and rinsing it out is moisturising hair, not washing it. If you want to cleanse your hair, you need to use a shampoo, cleansing conditioner or a co-wash. These products contain ingredients that help remove dirt, impurities and product buildup. 



5. Silicones and sulphates damage your hair.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


This is a core rule of the Curly Girl Method (CGM) and a huge misconception:

Silicones coat the hair and cover up the damage. As they build up, the most efficient way to remove them is by using sulphate shampoo. However, sulphates strip natural oils, causing dryness, frizz and damage. Thus, creating a vicious cycle. According to the CGM, you should never ever use them.


Silicones are not inherently bad for hair; water-insoluble silicones do build up on the hair shaft and are difficult to remove, however, water-soluble ones are easily removed with gentle shampoos, including sulfate-free shampoos.

Sulphates can be damaging to your hair. But they can also have some benefits; without cleansing sulphates, sebum quickly builds up on the scalp. This buildup will lead to a lot of itchiness, flakes, and over time this can lead to hair loss. Sulfate-free shampoos are an excellent option for most curlies, but if you feel the need to use a shampoo that contains sulphates, you can do so. The secret is to dilute it with water, only apply it to the hair roots and, alternate its use with a more moisturising shampoo. 



6. You must follow the Curly Girl Method.


Fact or Fiction? Fiction.


I think the Curly Girl Method is a good starting point for learning how to take care of curly hair, but it’s not the end-all-be-all of curly hair care. The truth is, it takes a lot of trial and error to find what works for your hair.


Curly hair is stunning, unique and sometimes hard to manage. Which one of these curl myths surprised you the most?








Friday, February 28, 2014

8 Tips for younger looking skin

February 28, 2014 3 Comments
Hello everyone!

We all want clear, healthy and young-looking skin.  Here are a few things you can do to prevent premature aging.

Drink plenty of water...
Simply put, soft drinks, caffeine and alcohol dehydrate you; water re-hydrates you.  Plus, water assists with circulation of vitamins and minerals. 

Don’t use soap...
Switch to a gentle, soap-free cleanser.  Soap dries the skin and strips it of all natural oils.  Soap is also a detergent and may contain harsh agents like SLS.  It can also clog up your pores.

Don't forget to moisturise...
Look for lightweight or water-based moisturisers which are less prone to clog your pores.  

Use an eye cream...
Products formulated for the area around your eyes give you more nutrients than your regular moisturiser.  You should use an eye cream if you have issues like, eye puffiness, dark circles and wrinkles around the eye area (crow's feet).  A regular face moisturiser will not help you with these issues.

Wear sunscreen everyday...
Sunscreen is not just for the  summer.  Everyone, regardless of skin type, should be wearing a sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 daily.  Choose one with a matte finish so make-up goes over it well. 

Don’t wait until bedtime to wash your face...
Wash your face as soon as you come home and follow up with a rich moisturiser.  Even if you don’t wear make-up, you need to cleanse your skin from pollution and dust.

Use natural skin care ingredients...
If you are not new to this blog, you already knew that fruits and vegetables make the best skin care ingredients.  Keep your kitchen pantry well stocked for DIY beauty recipes such as this one; DIY: Natural anti-wrinkle.

Lead a healthy lifestyle...
Stick to a healthy eating plan, exercise regularly and get at least 7 hours of sleep.


If you have more tips for younger looking skin, don't hesitate to share them in the comment section!  Also, check out the related posts below.  







Related posts:
Choosing facial cleansers
Eye cream or no eye cream?
Sunscreen 101
DIY: Natural anti-wrinkle


Want to see some more?  Click here to see what other stuff I post online:

Monday, September 17, 2012

Is your shampoo stripping your hair?

September 17, 2012 2 Comments

Is your shampoo stripping your hair of moisture?  Does your shampoo contain sulphates?  

Sulphates (sulfates) are the agents that make cleansing products lather.  Most shampoos contain Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate These ingredients, which are standard for most shampoo (and household cleaning products), strips the hair from natural oils, over-dry the hair and cause frizz (especially in curly hair).  Sulphates also damage coloured hair.  In fact, after a chemical treatment, colouring or hair extensions, hair stylists will often recommend a sulphate-free shampoo and conditioner.


Without sulphates there is no lather when you wash your hair so it takes some getting used to.  Cleansing your hair with a sulphate-free shampoo is very similar to co-washing (washing with conditioner only).  If you choose to co-wash, always use a sulphate-free and silicone-free conditioner.

However, if you use silicone-based hair products (conditioners, gels, creams, serums, etc.), you do need to use a sulphate shampoo to remove build-up!

So what can you do to make it less harsh?  Diluting your shampoo will help you get that perfect clean feeling while limiting the hair stripping and damage.

How to dilute your shampoo:
Mix 1 part water and 1 part shampoo in a spray bottle or applicator bottle.  You could also use an empty shampoo bottle.

Benefits:
  • You can target your scalp with the spray bottle or applicator bottle.
  • Makes thicker shampoos easy to spread and lather.
  • It’s less concentrated so less of your natural oils are being stripped out of your hair (less drying).
  • You use less shampoo and save money in the long run.

Do you dilute your shampoo?  What about co-washing and sulphate-free shampoos?  Have you tried any?  Let me know in the comments below.

XOXO
Euphrasie85

Related posts:

Photo form here.

Friday, October 21, 2011

Haircare products may cause acne!

October 21, 2011 1 Comments
Hello everyone!
Did you know that not only skincare products but also hair care products, can cause acne (acne cosmetica)?  If you breakout primarily around your hairline and/or forehead, your hair care products could be the cause.  That’s because, greasy or irritating ingredients in sprays, gels, mousses and waxes can clog pores.

hair gel
hair gel
Furthermore, your shampoo and conditioner may also cause acne around the hairline and/or forehead.  As I previously told you in Choosing facial cleansers, most shampoos contain Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate.  The percentage varies in different shampoos, but these chemicals are highly comedogenic and are known to cause breakouts in some people.  Besides, silicones like Dimethicone are also comedogenic ingredients commonly found in hair care products, particularly conditioners.  (Read Silicone-based hair care products if you want to know more.

shampoo bottles
shampoo and conditioner
So, if you tend to breakout around the hairline and forehead area; shampoo and condition your hair, rinse carefully (with cold water) and always wash your face afterwards.  You should also use as little product as necessary to get the job done.
Have a great weekend!
XOXO
Euphrasie85

Friday, October 07, 2011

Choosing facial cleansers

October 07, 2011 0 Comments
There are different types of facial cleansers, and they have different effects on the skin.  Facial cleansers can be divided mainly into two groups:

  •            Foaming cleansers
  •            Non-foaming cleansers
Foaming Facial Cleansers
You can find various types of foaming facial cleansers, including lotions, creams, gels, mousses and scrubs.

These facial cleansers lather, like soap, and have to be rinsed off with water.  Many people prefer these kinds of cleansers because they believe that they do a better job at cleansing the pores, than non-foaming ones.

Usually, a high foaming cleanser contains harsh deterging agents which, not only cleanse but also strip the skin from its natural oils.  Consequently, those kinds of cleansers dry and irritate the skin.  Both Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate are foaming agents used in most drugstore cleansers, soaps, shampoos, detergents, toothpaste and other products.  Both chemicals are very effective foaming agents, chemically known as surfactants.  Besides, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate are also comedogenic (i.e. can cause acne).

bubbles

Non-Foaming Facial Cleansers
Non-foaming cleansers typically include lotions (aka milks), creams and oils.

The non-foaming facial cleansers tend to be the mildest type of cleanser because they have a very small amount of surfactant (if any) and can be wiped off instead of rinsed off.  For this reason, they can deposit more of the cleanser's helpful ingredients such as; moisturisers, anti-oxidants and vitamins, on the skin.

Avoid using harsh deterging chemicals, on your skin, scalp and hair, as much as possible.  Try using natural and/or organic products that do not contain any harmful ingredients.  Always check the ingredients before buying a new product (any products, not just beauty products).  


In an earlier post, I wrote about irritating and comedogenic ingredients that can be found in beauty products.  Check it out and find out what other ingredients you should avoid!

XOXO
Euphrasie85